Power Profile

below is a blog post from Moving Forward

If you are like us, we like to get out and Nordic ski during the winter to help build the base, work on some athleticism, and of course have some fun.  With that being said, indoor cycling is very effective in also making you a better cyclist.  The question is, how do you know what the optimal training loads are?  Power profile testing is a fantastic way to get your training on track.  This requires the use of a computrainer or other ergonomic trainer.  You, the athlete, performs a thorough warm up.  Then proceeds with a battery of tests at varying intensities to see what you have in the tank.  This is a great benchmark test to use no matter what time of year to assess your fitness levels.  There are multiple modalities to use, Moving Forward will help you with choosing the correct test protocol to use.

Results from the test will help you optimize your pacing for whatever you are training while on the bike, whether it be sprinting, threshold, or otherwise.  Typical percentages of power and sample intervals to use are:

Power output Training examples

Sprinting 200-?? %                          5×150m (complete rest)

Anaerobic endurance 100-130%   5x(1+6min)

VO2 max 90-105%                           3x(3+2min)

Threshold 85- 90%                          3x(8+4min)

Endurance 50-85%                          3 hours

Recovery 40-50%                             1 hour

Typical Wattages for Cyclists are:

Peak Power for Time

Males

2 hours

1 hour

30 minutes

5 minutes

30  seconds

Average Joe

147-170

172-192

194-206

213-239

452-565

Cat 4 Rider

182-209

212-237

240-254

266-293

559-698

Domestic Pro

252-291

295-330

334-353

372-404

777-971

International Pro

275-317

321-359

364-388

394-452

846-1057

taken from:

334-291 Vogt, S., Heinrich, L. et.al. “Power Output during Stage Racing in Professional Road Cycling,” Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, January, 2006. Volume 38:1 pp 147-151.

Sorry, we don’t have any ranges for females, however, during a recent review from the European Journal of Applied Physiology, those female World Cup athletes on a hilly course had maximal numbers of 800+Watts with and average of about 170 Watts.

Remember that training with power is nothing new, it has been around for quite some time.  If you don’t have a power meter, you can still reap benefits from the power profile test(s).  You’ll have a little more guess work, but it can still be associated with your rate of perceived exertion or heart rate.  Remember that regular testing will help you train optimally.  You can minimize your guesswork about your training zones.  Let us know if you have any questions.  Matthew at 406 580 7987.  Have an excellent day!

3 thoughts on “Power Profile”

Comments are closed.